Goffs

Goffs was once a railroad junction town where the California Eastern Railway branched off the Santa Fe mainline.  At one time, this railroad that was built in 1893 reached out from Goffs as the sole supply line to a small outpost known as Las Vegas, Nevada.  How times have changed.  Later, Goffs was yet another town that Route 66 passed through.  Today, it houses a collection of Mojave Desert artifacts in a small museum created by historian Dennis Casebier.
Goffs

Scenes around Goffs:

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    Goffs is another small town along Route 66 and is access point to the Mojave National Preserve
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    Goffs was originally a railroad junction town
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    Goffs is known for its restored schoolhouse, which is a museum.
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    The museum has many preserved relics from the area
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    The restored Goffs railroad station which is part of the museum
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    Preserved signs inside the museum which were originally placed by the AAA when Route 66 was built

Goffs was named by the Santa Fe railroad to be in alphabetical with towns beginning at Amboy, with the letter A, and ending in Needles with the letter N.  As mentioned, it was mainly a railroad junction town with the California Eastern Railway.

The main attraction at Goffs is the one-room schoolhouse that has been restored and is now a cultural center and museum.  The schoolhouse, which has always been at its current location, was closed in 1937 and was badly damaged by the elements and vandalism.  The Mojave Desert Heritage & Cultural Association (www.mdhca.org), got funding in the 1990’s to restore the schoolhouse and work was completed in 1998.

The Association currently maintains the cultural center and is also responsible for the preservation of various sites of historical value throughout the Mojave Desert including some sites within the Preserve boundaries.  The original purpose of the Association’s founder, Dennis Casebier, was to begin the preservation of the Mojave Road.  The Mojave Road, also referred to the “Old Government Road to Fort Mojave”, was a road developed in the 1850s to support early travelers between Arizona and Southern California.

This original task of the cultural center has definitely succeeded and the facility you see here is Casebier’s on-going goal of preserving historical artifacts of the East Mojave Desert.  The cultural center is now more like a museum.  This is evident as the it holds many desert area relics which the Association has collected and rescued from decay and vandalism.

Before visiting the cultural center, be sure to check their website for hours of operation or call to schedule a visit.

Where is Goffs?